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UAL Research Online

The retrieval of self-defining memories is associated with the activation of specific working selves

Cili, Soljana and Stopa, Lusia (2015) The retrieval of self-defining memories is associated with the activation of specific working selves. Memory, 23 (2). pp. 233-253.

Type of Research: Article
Creators: Cili, Soljana and Stopa, Lusia
Description:

This article presents two studies that investigated the impact of the retrieval of self-defining memories on individuals' sense of self. Participants recalled positive and/or negative self-defining memories, rated memory characteristics and completed measures focusing on different self-aspects. Study 1 found that participants reported higher state self-esteem after recalling a positive memory than after recalling a negative one. They also reported lower negative self-consistency and higher state self-concept clarity and positive self-consistency, but this result became non-significant after controlling for state self-esteem. Study 2 found that participants reported higher state self-esteem, a marginally higher proportion of recreation/exploration, goals and a marginally lower proportion of achievement goals after recalling a positive memory than after recalling a negative one. They also reported a higher proportion of self-cognitions referring to emotional states after recalling memories from which they had not abstracted meaning than after recalling memories from which they had done this. These findings suggest that the retrieval of vivid, emotional and highly self-relevant memories may be accompanied by the activation of specific self-representations or working selves. They also suggest that the experience of memory-related intrusive images may temporarily influence individuals' sense of self. The implications of these findings for clinical practice are discussed.

Your affiliations with UAL: Colleges > London College of Fashion
Date: January 2015
Digital Object Identifier: 10.1080/09658211.2014.882955
Date Deposited: 22 May 2018 09:45
Last Modified: 22 May 2018 09:45
Item ID: 12607
URI: http://ualresearchonline.arts.ac.uk/id/eprint/12607

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