We use cookies on this website, you can read about them here. To use the website as intended please... ACCEPT COOKIES

Wilhelm Sandberg’s experimenta typographica: domestic origins and post-war impact

Horton, Ian (2010) Wilhelm Sandberg’s experimenta typographica: domestic origins and post-war impact. In: Association of Art Historians Annual Conference, University of Glasgow (Conference Session - Supplementary Conflicts: Domesticities and Life Histories in Wartime), 15 - 17 April 2010, Glasgow, Scotland. [Creative Arts and Design > Design studies
Creative Arts and Design > Graphic Design
Creative Arts and Design > Others in Creative Arts and Design]
 
Details
 
Creators:Horton, Ian
Description:

Histories of warfare and insurrection have evolved constantly reflecting, in part, reactions to the shifting nature of war caused by factors including technological innovation, ideological motivation and institutional development. This session will explore personal visual responses to conflict, defined as the activities of armed groupings prepared to use lethal force to achieve political aims. It will consider the role played by visual culture in developing supplementary historical topoi that accompany, and may challenge, both popular and official accounts. We will explore personal visual responses to conflict produced in, or in relation to, the domestic sphere and everyday life, defined as visual representations of subjects played out in the social and political spheres.

Personal visual responses to conflict bear upon subject and identity formation. This session hopes to offer useful insights into the relationship between the historical constituted as narrative, on one hand, and the autobiographical as fantasy (rather than as fiction) on the other. This is not to say that the autobiographical provides greater insight into human experience than other modes of historical inquiry. Rather, this session will hold that autobiographical responses to conflict comprise just one productive source that provides access to the dynamic between the experience of ordinary people and subsequent wider accounts of the same event, in relation to which the personal may emerge as either complementary or subversive. Either way, the dynamic destabilises any tendency to accede unreflexively to dominant accounts of past conflicts. The session will explore the role personal responses to conflict play in the mediation of history and ideology, private and public narrations of history, and individual and collective identities.

Type of Research:Conference, Symposium or Workshop Item (Paper)
Additional Information (Publicly available):

Histories of warfare and insurrection have evolved constantly reflecting, in part, reactions to the shifting nature of war caused by factors including technological innovation, ideological motivation and institutional development. This session will explore personal visual responses to conflict, defined as the activities of armed groupings prepared to use lethal force to achieve political aims. It will consider the role played by visual culture in developing supplementary historical topoi that accompany, and may challenge, both popular and official accounts. We will explore personal visual responses to conflict produced in, or in relation to, the domestic sphere and everyday life, defined as visual representations of subjects played out in the social and political spheres.

Personal visual responses to conflict bear upon subject and identity formation. This session hopes to offer useful insights into the relationship between the historical constituted as narrative, on one hand, and the autobiographical as fantasy (rather than as fiction) on the other. This is not to say that the autobiographical provides greater insight into human experience than other modes of historical inquiry. Rather, this session will hold that autobiographical responses to conflict comprise just one productive source that provides access to the dynamic between the experience of ordinary people and subsequent wider accounts of the same event, in relation to which the personal may emerge as either complementary or subversive. Either way, the dynamic destabilises any tendency to accede unreflexively to dominant accounts of past conflicts. The session will explore the role personal responses to conflict play in the mediation of history and ideology, private and public narrations of history, and individual and collective identities.

Keywords/subjects not otherwise listed:museums, design, autobiography
Your affiliations with UAL:Colleges > London College of Communication
Date:April 2010
Related Websites:http://www.aah.org.uk/page/3268
Event Location:Glasgow, Scotland
Projects or Series:Research Outputs Review (April 2010 - April 2011)
ID Code:4398
Deposited By:Prerna Bhatt
Deposited On:02 Nov 2011 14:55
Last Modified:08 Aug 2012 16:33
Repository Staff Only: item control page